Archive for ‘Conferences, Colloquia and Symposia’

October 6, 2014

Subotnik Speaking at Symposium on Authors and Performers

Eva Subotnik

Eva Subotnik

This Friday, October 10th, Professor Eva Subotnik will join Professor Molly van Houweling of UC Berkeley Law School and Professor Daniel Gervais of Vanderbilt Law School for a panel discussion at Columbia Law School’s symposium addressing the concerns of professional authors, artists and performers and suggesting changes to law and practice that would benefit authors and encourage creativity.  Professor Subotnik will present a talk entitled “Actors and Artists as Authors,” forthcoming in the Columbia Journal of Law & the Arts, which will explore the degree to which different kinds of creative professionals can and do benefit from the status of “author” under the Copyright Act.

October 6, 2014

Cunningham Addresses ABA Conference

Larry Cunningham

Larry Cunningham

On October 4, 2014, Larry Cunningham, the Law School’s Associate Academic Dean, spoke at the Fall Leadership Summit of the American Bar Association’s Law Student Division.  He presented on the panel, “Getting the Most Out of Law School: Student and Administration Integration.”  He addressed ways that law school administrators and students can work together to further career development.  Dean Cunningham talked about St. John’s Law’s strategic priority of helping students achieve their career goals and initiatives that have been developed to improve job placement.  He provided advice to the audience, student leaders from schools in the northeast and mid-Atlantic, about ways they can work with administrators at their law schools to improve job outcomes.

September 29, 2014

Wade’s Article on Diversity on Corporate Boards Published

Cheryl Wade

Cheryl Wade

Professor Cheryl Wade was invited to participate at a Financial Roundtable on comparative corporate governance sponsored by the law schools at the University of British Columbia and Osgoode Hall last month. Each participant contributed a chapter about corporate governance, finance, or securities law that discussed where the world is in the aftermath of the financial crisis.

Professor Wade’s article, Gender Diversity on Corporate Boards: How Racial Politics Impedes Progress in the United States, was just published in a symposium issue of the Pace University School of Law International Law Review on Comparative Sex Regimes and Corporate Governance.

July 28, 2014

Barrett Lectures in Nuremberg

John Barrett

John Barrett

On July 16th, Professor John Q. Barrett participated in a Nuremberg Memorium program in Courtroom 600 in the Palace of Justice, Nuremberg, Germany, site of the historic Nuremberg trials following World War II.  Following a lecture by Dr. Oscar Schneider, a former German Federal Minister, Professor Barrett spoke on “New Law and Not-New Law:   Justice Jackson’s Opening Statement at Nuremberg, Addressing the Legality of the Trial.”

While in Nuremberg, Professor Barrett also lectured in Creighton University School of Law’s summer program, “From Nuremberg to The Hague.”

Professor Barrett, biographer of U.S. Supreme Court Justice and Nuremberg chief prosecutor Robert H. Jackson (1892-1954) and writer of “The Jackson List,” is an expert on Jackson, the Nuremberg trials and their legacies.  He regularly teaches, speaks and writes about Nuremberg, Jackson and related topics throughout the U.S. and internationally.

July 28, 2014

Arbitration Study by Sovern, Greenberg, Kirgis, and Liu Presented to State Appellate Court Judges at Pound Forum

Professor Jeff Sovern presented the results of the arbitration study he, Professors Elayne Greenberg, Paul Kirgis, and St. John’s University Director of Institutional Assessment Yuxiang Liu have conducted to the Pound Civil Justice Institute’s Forum for State Appellate Court Judges on July 26.  Professor Sovern was the luncheon speaker, at an event attended by judges from three dozen states.

 

Jeff Sovern

Jeff Sovern

Elayne Greenberg

Elayne Greenberg

Paul Kirgis

Paul Kirgis

 

July 27, 2014

Sheff Speaks at Intellectual Property Scholars Conference

Jeremy Sheff

Jeremy Sheff

Professor Jeremy Sheff’s current research project, “Who Should Pay for Progress?”, has been selected as the lead presentation of the opening plenary session of the 14th Annual Intellectual Property Scholars Conference at UC Berkeley.  IPSC is the largest annual gathering of the intellectual property law academy, with over 150 scholars from all over the world presenting this year.  Professor Sheff’s project investigates how societies do and should satisfy the moral claims of individuals who create new knowledge.

July 25, 2014

Wade Speaks at Southeastern Association of Law Schools Annual Meeting

Cheryl Wade

Cheryl Wade

Professor Cheryl Wade will present a book chapter at the Southeastern Association of Law Schools Annual Meeting on August 3rd, 2014.  Her presentation is part of a panel on Financial Institutions Law and Regulation.

July 19, 2014

Salomone Speaks at International Political Science Association World Congress

Rosemary Salomone

Rosemary Salomone

Professor Rosemary Salomone will speak on Monday, July 21st at the International Political Science Association 23rd World Congress in Montreal. The topic of her paper is “Making New Citizens: Transatlantic Perspectives on Language, Belonging and Immigrant Schooling.” The following is a summary:

Policies on language and schooling in the United States and Western Europe reveal a decided concern for preserving social cohesion in the face of mounting immigration and cultural and religious diversity. This paper examines how that concern finds expression in contrasting discourses on linguistic pluralism and multiculturalism, how the apparent disconnect between the political rhetoric and reality affects the lives of immigrant students, how the distinct ways in which Europeans and Americans talk about language and immigration influence public attitudes and define the range of language policy options, and how the debate over the role of language in the schools, in one way or another, seems to ignore the impact of globalization and transnationalism and the connection among language, belonging, and citizenship. The discussion begins with the United States where the argument for maintaining immigrant languages, predominantly Spanish, in the schools holds diminishing support despite an unofficial “multiculturalism lite” as a heralded aspect of American identity. By way of contrast, it examines the challenges faced by Western European nations under competing pressures of global English for productivity and supranational directives on multilingualism for European integration and job mobility, while at the same time officially rejecting a presumably “thicker” form of multiculturalism as a politically destabilizing force.

October 18, 2013

Alexander Publishes Article on the CPLR at Fifty

Professor Vincent C. Alexander has just published an article in the N.Y.U. Journal of Legislation and Public Policy entitled,  The CPLR at Fifty: A View from Academia.  The article is based on remarks Professor Alexander delivered at NYU’s Dwight D. Opperman Institute of Judicial Administration on March 12, 2013, as part of a symposium on the fiftieth anniversary of the adoption of New York’s Civil Practice Law and Rules (“CPLR”).

The CPLR has its roots in New York’s groundbreaking Field Code of 1848, but it has evolved into a multifaceted code that carries forward a few too many eccentric and arguably outmoded rules of procedure.  The symposium participants, whose remarks are included in the publication, include U.S. Senior District Judge Jack B. Weinstein, who was one of the principal authors of the CPLR, former New York Court of Appeals Chief Judge Judith S. Kaye, NYU Law Professors Oscar G. Chase and William E. Nelson, and practitioner/author David L. Ferstendig.

The symposium reflects upon the creation of the CPLR, its strengths and weaknesses, and its place in the history of procedural reform.  Professor Alexander provides an academic perspective, focusing on the teaching, scholarship and law reform opportunities that the CPLR provides.  He argues that the New York courts, acting through the Chief Administrative Judge, Judicial Conference and CPLR Advisory Committee, rather than the Legislature alone, should be given the authority to amend the CPLR.  Nevertheless, his article concludes:

 [T]he CPLR has served the bench and bar of New York quite effectively for the past fifty years.  It carries forward New York traditions that apparently are near and dear to the hearts of New York judges and attorneys, and there is value in that.  It is a testament to the CPLR’s durability that, unlike the pre-1963 era of New York history, there have been no widespread calls for the overhaul of the New York procedure code.  The CPLR may have some quirks, but on the whole, it is a coherent code of procedure . . . .  The CPLR gives New York litigants a fair and reasonable means of having their disputes resolved on the merits.  Such is the purpose of procedure.

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October 17, 2013

Subotnik to Present Paper at Workshop on Intellectual Property and Constitutional Law

Professor Eva Subotnik will present her paper, Constitutional Obstacles? Reconsidering Copyright Protection for Pre-1972 Sound Recordings, co-authored with June M. Besek, this Friday October 18th at the “IP, Meet the Constitution” Junior Scholars Workshop at Columbia Law School.  The workshop, co-sponsored by Columbia and Hofstra Law Schools and the Federalist Society, will bring together scholars from Brooklyn, Cardozo, Hofstra, University of Pennsylvania and Yale Law Schools.  In their paper, Subotnik and Besek discuss the constitutional issues implicated by the possible extension of federal copyright protection to pre-1972 sound recordings, which currently enjoy only state law protection.  The paper is one of the few to address the application of Takings and Due Process law to ‘intellectual’ property, and the issues they discuss may have broad implications for future congressional amendments to IP statutes.  The paper will be published this Spring in the Columbia Journal of Law & the Arts.  An abstract is available here.

eva

 

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