Archive for November 4th, 2015

November 4, 2015

DeGirolami and Movsesian Present at Notre Dame Law Review Symposium on Dignitatis Humanae

Professors Marc DeGirolami and Mark Movsesian will present papers later this week as part of theMarc DeGirolami University of Notre Dame Law School’s annual Law Review symposium, which this year commemorates the 50th anniversary of Dignitatis Humanae, Vatican II’s declaration on religious liberty:

The Symposium will begin with an address from Bishop Daniel E. Flores on Thursday, November 5. Bishop Flores currently serves as the Bishop of Brownsville, Texas.

The Symposium panelists will present their works on Friday, November 6.  Panelists include

Mark Movsesian

Mark Movsesian

Professors Thomas Berg of the University of St. Thomas School of Law, Paul Horwitz of the University of Alabama School of Law, Christopher Lund of Wayne State University Law School, Mark Movsesian and Marc DeGirolami of St. John’s University School of Law, Brett Scharffs of Brigham Young University Law School, Steven Smith of the University of San Diego School of Law, Anna Su of the University of Toronto Faculty of Law, and Richard Garnett and Phillip Muñoz of Notre Dame Law School.  The panels will be moderated by Judge Richard Sullivan of the Southern District of New York.

The Symposium will feature a keynote address from John H. Garvey, President of The Catholic University of America.

Papers will appear in a forthcoming issue of the Notre Dame Law Review. Details about the symposium are here.

November 4, 2015

Lazaro quoted in The Street

Christine Lazaro

Professor Lazaro was quoted in The Street on shared responsibility defenses raised by brokerage firms during arbitrations.  The article covered a panel on the topic from the PIABA Annual Meeting in late October on which Professor Lazaro participated:

 

Christine Lazaro, director of the Securities Arbitration Clinic at St. John’s University in Queens, N.Y., told an audience of Piaba members that even in cases where salespeople have put customers into inappropriate investments, financial firms are arguing that the client — not the broker — has failed at their duty to properly monitor an account.

That makes no sense, she said, because brokers have an obligation to recommend suitable investments in the first place. How can vigilant monitoring help the investor who started off with a portfolio that was never right for them?

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